Punctuation

You may think punctuation is a boring topic, but I beg to differ. It’s more than a tedious lecture in English class. Victor Borge did an extremely funny bit about punctuation where each mark had its own particular noise. There are several books that tackle the topic of punctuation using humor, such as Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss and Lapsing Into a Comma by Bill Walsh. However you approach punctuation, you need it to write your novel.

I often come across manuscripts where punctuation is an afterthought. Periods are added outside quotation marks or left off altogether. Commas are sprinkled liberally wherever they may fall, and question marks and exclamation points seem to make their appearances on a whim. Apostrophes seem to either be nonexistent or used every time an s appears at the end of a word.

If words are the meat and potatoes of writing, punctuation is the seasoning. It not only brings the meal together, it brings out the flavor.

If you didn’t pay attention in English class, there are lots of books, like the ones I mentioned earlier, that can help. These are some of the tools of your trade. Learn to use them. Would you go see your local symphony if the violinists didn’t know how to use their bows? Of course not! Do you expect your mechanic to know how to use a wrench? Of course you do! As a writer, you need to know how these things work. If you can’t tell a question from a statement, you need to review your basics, including punctuation.

As I wrote last week, you need to learn your craft. Punctuation is part of this. If you wanted to learn to paint with oils, you would learn how to mix colors, use your brush effectively, how to paint light and shadow, how to paint forms and movement. You wouldn’t expect to just dab your fingers into the paint and have done. You would have to learn the basics before you could apply the artistry. The same holds true with writing. Master the basics and then you can soar. Learn where the dots, dashes, and squiggles go. They direct your reader and help interpret your meaning.

“Hi, Brenda.”  This statement is a lot different than “Hi, Brenda!” The whole meaning changes. One goes from the mundane and expected to excitement. If you’re not sure what you’re doing, practice changing the punctuation in a sentence and read it out loud. See how it changes your inflection? If you’re already dreading homework, you’re not cut out to be a writer, because that’s what writing is… perpetual homework you’re giving yourself. So what are you waiting for? Get to work.

Common Errors

Thought I’d post about some of the most common errors I’ve seen while I’ve been editing lately. Keep these in mind when you’re self-editing before you submit your manuscript to an editor, agent or publisher. For those of you who make them, just be aware. I am not making any judgments about these; I just want writers to be aware of them.

Chocked instead of choked
I’ve seen this a lot lately in several different manuscripts by different authors.

Periods before dialogue attributions
Lots of this in many different manuscripts. When you place an attribution, end the dialogue with a comma, a question mark or an exclamation mark, as appropriate.

Hyphens instead of dashes
When you want to use a dash, use one. Don’t substitute a hyphen instead. They are not the same thing. You can make an en dash by pushing the Ctrl button and the minus button at the same time. You can make an em dash by pushing the Ctrl button, the Alt button and the minus button at the same time.

Ellipses only have three dots
Ellipses have three dots, not four, and not a long string of dots. To make an ellipse in Word that acts as a single character so it won’t get split from one line to the next, hold down the Alt button while you put in the numbers 0133.

Ending punctuation
If you’re in the USA, place your periods and commas inside the quotation marks. Don’t leave them dangling.

Shuttered instead of shuddered
I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen this over the past few months. If your character is creeped out and shuddering, say so. If your character’s house is shuttered up to protect the windows, so be it.

Breath and breathe
Boy, do these two get mixed up a lot! If your character needs to breathe, add the e. If they are taking a breath, leave it off.

Could of, Should of, Would of
Don’t do this. It is could have, should have and would have. If you want the words to sound like of, use could’ve, should’ve or would’ve.

Bear and Bare
Yes, they sound alike, but they are two different things! Bear is either a large, wild animal or your character is having to carry a heavy burden. Bare is, well, you know, without clothing. Even worse is a local exercise place that uses bare in their name and a teddy bear in their logo. 😛

Boarder and Border

A border is a line, an edge or barrier. The yard had a border of marigolds. The excited couple gazed over the border into Mexico. A boarder is someone renting a room.

Well, that’s about it for now. I’m sure I’ll have more to add in another post on another day.

What Editing Does For the Writer

.What Editing Does For the Writer

What Editing Does For the Writer… So, you’re a writer. You slave over your masterpiece. It is a part of you. It is part of your heart and soul. Why would you want to hand it over to some editor to cut to ribbons?

I don’t want to cut your masterpiece to ribbons. I want to hone it to a fine polish to make you look the very best you can look. Think of it as taking you out of your ragged blue jeans with the paint splotches on them and the torn tshirt and putting you into a nice outfit that shows off all of your best attributes. When we’re finished, your hair is done perfectly and you feel like a million bucks. You’re ready to take on the world. That is what I try to do to your manuscript.

I fix all the spelling errors (even spellcheck doesn’t get them all!). I fix the grammar and punctuation (except where it needs to remain awkward to make a point). I suggest ways to make the writing tighter and smoother. As the author, you always retain the right to dismiss any of my suggestions, but I hope you’ll be open enough to consider them.

I’m not a drill sergeant, living for the moment when I can scream orders at you. I have a gentle voice. One filled with nurturing suggestions. First, I read through your manuscript so I get the whole picture from beginning to end. Then, I slowly and carefully begin my work. I don’t want to supplant your voice with my own. I am happy to remain in the background. I may make suggestions on phrasing or different words you could try, but the ultimate rewriting should come from you. The manuscript is your baby, after all.

We can work together to make your book the best it can be. Doesn’t it bug you when you buy a book and it is full of sloppy errors? I can’t tell you how many books I’ve read that would have made a much better impression if they had been edited before they were published. No matter how good the story is, it is hard to get past those errors. I want your book to be as perfect as possible, so you don’t have to have readers write to you and point out simple errors. And they will. It is worth the extra effort to fact check anything technical. For example, I recently read a passage about a woman having an amniocentesis and finding out the sex of the baby. Unfortunately, in the book, they scheduled it at 13 weeks gestation, when in reality, amnios are only done between 15 and 20 weeks of pregnancy. How would it have changed the story to move it ahead two weeks so it was accurate? Try as I might, I had a very hard time getting past this wrong timing. Now, perhaps only a few readers would be bothered by that, but I’ve spent years studying childbirth, so it really bothered me. Too bad, too… the story was good and well written.

If it isn’t childbirth, it will be something else. Maybe what kind of flowers bloom in June in Massachusetts, or perhaps when the storms hit on the Firth of Forth. Somewhere, someone will notice your inaccuracy. As an editor, it is my job to help you make your book so good that there are no errors for people to pick up. You want your readers to be so engrossed in your story that they can’t put it down; finding errors will wake them out of their thrall with your book. It can ruin the experience for them. Take the time and work with an editor. It is worth the effort and the cost